Grammar Basics: Verbs

Verbs describe a physical (run, jump, talk) or mental (think, confuse, guess) action or a state of being (to exist, to live, to be).
With a noun or pronoun (which primarily functions as “subject”), verbs tell us what the subject does or performs. Even though that might sound easy to understand, there are, however, a couple of things you have to keep in mind, especially if you’re currently trying to learn English. So, let’s get going, shall we? Continue reading Grammar Basics: Verbs

SOS English: Who vs. Whom

“Who” and “whoever” are so-called “subjective pronouns,” whereas “whom” and “whomever” are used for objective cases. Usually, we use those words in combination with a question or a relative clause about a person. Although the usage of “who” and “whom” is quite simple to most people, some may still stumble upon some difficulties.
With this short guide, it’ll be much easier for you to decide when to use “who” or “whom” correctly in the future! Continue reading SOS English: Who vs. Whom

To Hyphenate or Not to Hyphenate – That’s The Question

You may or may not believe it, but sometimes even co-workers here at Grammatica struggle to find out when to use a hyphen in English. Then I’ll get the question ‘To hyphen or not to hyphen?’ and that’s when we figured we should create an own article for that specific topic. Yes, this one’s for you, Christoph. Continue reading To Hyphenate or Not to Hyphenate – That’s The Question

How To Fix “Run-On Sentences”

“Run-on” sentences are just compound sentences gone wrong. Like very wrong. You could also say that “run-on” sentences consist of too many ideas and thoughts without the proper punctuation. If “compound sentences” and “dependent vs. independent clauses” don’t ring a bell, make sure to check out one of our previous articles. But continue reading to find out how to recognize run-on sentences and especially how to fix them! Continue reading How To Fix “Run-On Sentences”

SOS English: e.g. vs. i.e.

You’ve probably heard and also used the terms “e.g.” and “i.e.,” especially in scholarly writing. It’s also possible that you’ve used them interchangeably as many other people do. However, these two abbreviations that actually derive from Latin (and not English) mean different things. It is necessary to use the correct abbreviation to ensure that the meaning of a sentence is retained.
You mostly use “e.g.” and “i.e.” at the beginning of a nonrestrictive element which is enclosed in either commas or parentheses. It’s also suggested to use a comma after both “e.g.” and “i.e.”
But let’s have a closer look! Continue reading SOS English: e.g. vs. i.e.