SOS English: Who vs. Whom

“Who” and “whoever” are so-called “subjective pronouns,” whereas “whom” and “whomever” are used for objective cases. Usually, we use those words in combination with a question or a relative clause about a person. Although the usage of “who” and “whom” is quite simple to most people, some may still stumble upon some difficulties.
With this short guide, it’ll be much easier for you to decide when to use “who” or “whom” correctly in the future! Continue reading SOS English: Who vs. Whom

SOS English: e.g. vs. i.e.

You’ve probably heard and also used the terms “e.g.” and “i.e.,” especially in scholarly writing. It’s also possible that you’ve used them interchangeably as many other people do. However, these two abbreviations that actually derive from Latin (and not English) mean different things. It is necessary to use the correct abbreviation to ensure that the meaning of a sentence is retained.
You mostly use “e.g.” and “i.e.” at the beginning of a nonrestrictive element which is enclosed in either commas or parentheses. It’s also suggested to use a comma after both “e.g.” and “i.e.”
But let’s have a closer look! Continue reading SOS English: e.g. vs. i.e.