How To Fix “Run-On Sentences”

“Run-on” sentences are just compound sentences gone wrong. Like very wrong. You could also say that “run-on” sentences consist of too many ideas and thoughts without the proper punctuation. If “compound sentences” and “dependent vs. independent clauses” don’t ring a bell, make sure to check out one of our previous articles. But continue reading to find out how to recognize run-on sentences and especially how to fix them! Continue reading How To Fix “Run-On Sentences”

SOS English: e.g. vs. i.e.

You’ve probably heard and also used the terms “e.g.” and “i.e.,” especially in scholarly writing. It’s also possible that you’ve used them interchangeably as many other people do. However, these two abbreviations that actually derive from Latin (and not English) mean different things. It is necessary to use the correct abbreviation to ensure that the meaning of a sentence is retained.
You mostly use “e.g.” and “i.e.” at the beginning of a nonrestrictive element which is enclosed in either commas or parentheses. It’s also suggested to use a comma after both “e.g.” and “i.e.”
But let’s have a closer look! Continue reading SOS English: e.g. vs. i.e.

iTranslate becomes an AI-Powerhouse and Grammatica transitions to a Multi-Platform Product

iTranslate’s mission is to give its users the perfect tool to read, write, and speak in all languages, anywhere in the world.  With “Grammatica,” iTranslate’s AI-Powered writing assistant released in August, the company went beyond just breaking down language barriers … Continue reading iTranslate becomes an AI-Powerhouse and Grammatica transitions to a Multi-Platform Product